MAKING AN IMPACT

Cocoa Life is dedicated to making an impact across the cocoa supply chain—not just in farming communities, but also in the chocolate you enjoy.

In addition to publishing our progress every year, we engage FLOCERT and Ipsos to verify Cocoa Life is accomplishing what we set out to do. It allows us to learn what works and what we can improve.

Our Progress

We hold ourselves accountable for creating real change in cocoa-growing communities. By 2022, Cocoa Life aims to reach 200,000 farmers and one million community members. Our ultimate goal is to source all of Mondelēz International's cocoa sustainably, mainly through Cocoa Life.

By the end of 2017:
  • farmers tools Created with Sketch.

    Cocoa Life reached
    120,500
    cocoa farmers

  • community Created with Sketch.

    in
    1,085
    communities

  • chocolate Created with Sketch.

    and
    35%
    of Mondelēz International's cocoa was sustainably sourced

We recognize change takes time. But one thing is certain—we are committed to helping our farming communities transform.

Read about our progress
2017 GLOBAL PROGRESS DASHBOARD

This dashboard demonstrates the scale achieved by the end of 2017 and how Cocoa Life is making progress in four key cocoa origin countries: Ghana, Côte d’Ivoire, Indonesia and Dominican Republic. Cocoa Life monitors the below output indicators under five focus areas. These are interventions we put in place with our partners.

Farming
Farming icon
Farmers trained on Good Agricultural Practices (GAPs)1
88,134
Cocoa seedlings distributed (through Cocoa Life)
5,753,969
Cocoa farming demonstration plots operational2
884
Nurseries created3
583
Hectares of cocoa farms mapped4
135,566

  1. Farmers trained are farmers enrolled in the program. Once they follow the attendance criteria, they are selected as Cocoa Life farmers. GAPs are recommendations made to the farmers so they can increase the yield on their farms. The data is currently not accounting for farmers in Côte d’Ivoire who received training through individual coaching. 
  2. Demonstration plots show what "good" looks like so farmers know what to expect when adopting the GAP. 
  3. This includes both professional and traditional nurseries. 
  4. One hectare is 10,000 square meters. To compare, a football field is about 7,500 square meters. 
Community
Community icon
Community Development Committees (CODECs) operational in communities1
647
Community Action Plans (CAPs) activated2
1,030
Communities with CAP projects completed3
503
Community members trained on gender awareness
59,404

  1. CODEC members are elected by their communities (or comparable) to represent them in defining the CAP priorities. CODECs may cover several communities. 
  2. Cocoa Life facilitates the development of the CAP through the CODEC. The CAP defines the priorities the community (or comparable) agrees to work on and is owned by the community. A CAP may cover several communities. 
  3. These communities have successfully raised resources and advocated to start implementing any of the 10 priorities listed in the CAP. 
Livelihoods
Livelihoods icon
Village Savings and Loan Associations (VSLAs) operational1
1,828
Community members who participate in VSLAs
51,566
VSLAs linked to finance institutions2
7
Community members trained on financial literacy3
29,728
Community members trained on business management4
28,589
Community members involved in additional Income Generating Activities (IGA)
17,096

  1. A VSLA (or a similar model) is a group of people who save together and take small loans from those savings. 
  2. Once a VSLA is strong enough, we link them with financial institutions so they can access professional banking services. 
  3. Financial literacy includes training on saving, loans, and household financial planning. 
  4. This includes knowledge on business planning, administration and marketing for small enterprises. 
Youth
Youth icon
Community members and farmers educated on issues of child labor and forced child labor
53,748
Communities with Child Protection Committees (CPCs)1
516
Communities with a Child Labor Monitoring and Remediation System (CLMRS)2
137
Youth trained on cocoa-related enterprises3
7,591

  1. The primary purpose of the CPC is to promote and protect the total well-being of all children in the community. Its responsibilities include liaising with the School Management Committee and the Parents-Teachers Associations to ensure all school-going children are enrolled and retained in schools. 
  2. Cocoa Life's CLMRS is community-based and child-centric. Its scope goes beyond the cocoa supply chain to include the community as a whole, and addresses the issue from prevention to remediation. 
  3. Youth is the age range from 18-35 in Ghana and Côte d'Ivoire, and 15-24 in Indonesia. 
Environment
Environment icon
Community members trained on Good Environmental Practices (GEPs)1
68,163
Economic shade trees distributed (through Cocoa Life)
1,162,102

  1. GEPs are recommended practices which will include, for instance, how to conserve the soil or practices for reasonable and safe use of agrochemicals. 
About the Dashboard
Cocoa Life routinely collects monitoring data from our partners as part of the ongoing review of program performance at the local level, so we can apply learnings to improve program outcomes in the future.
HOW WE MEASURE PROGRESS
OUR 10 GLOBAL KPIs

Cocoa Life uses Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) to measure how effectively we are achieving our business objectives and fulfilling our commitment to our focus areas.

  • Farming
    farming_rounded Created with Sketch.
    • cocoa income Net income from cocoa
    • cocoa productivity Cocoa productivity
  • Community
    community_rounded Created with Sketch.
    • women's participation Increase in women's participation in decision-making process
    • plan development Increase capacity in the community to plan and advocate for their own social development
  • Livelihoods
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    • net income Net income from sources other than cocoa
    • cocoa farmers Cocoa farmers’ reduced vulnerability to external shocks
  • Youth
    youth_rounded Created with Sketch.
    • child labor reduction Reduction in child labor and forced child labor
    • career opportunity increase Increase in career opportunities for youth in cocoa sector
  • Environment
    environment_rounded Created with Sketch.
    • sustainable natural resources Helping future farming generations through sustainable natural resources use on farm
    • forest conservation Increase in conservation of forests and maintenance of ecosystems


Verification

To verify our impact on farmers and their communities and measure progress towards our goal of sourcing all our cocoa sustainably, consistent evaluation is needed. Two independent third parties—Ipsos and FLOCERT—keep us on track.

  • Impact Evaluation

    Ipsos measures our progress on the ground by conducting farmer, farmer household and community studies. They are designed to evaluate Cocoa Life’s 10 global KPIs. Reports will be published at Baseline, after two years (Wave 1), and after four years (Wave 2).


    Ipsos is a global non-partisan, objective research practice.

    Ipsos
  • Supply Chain Verification

    FLOCERT verifies the flow of cocoa from Cocoa Life communities into our supply chain. It also verifies the benefits cocoa farmers receive, such as premium payments and clear trade terms. Verification drives learning and transparency, and ensures we are sourcing from the farming communities we invest in.

    FLOCERT is a socially-focused and leading global certification body.

    Flocert
Impact Evaluations
progress report

10/02/2017
IMPACT IN INDONESIA - Outcome Assessment of 2015 Cohort by Ipsos

In this report, Ipsos describes the impact Cocoa Life has made on the very first cohort of farmers to participate in the program in Indonesia. This cohort includes 7,115 farmers who entered the program in 2015 across two regions of the country. Key highlights:

Cocoa productivity and incomes
10% increase cocoa yields
37% annual cocoa incomes
 
Entrepreneurship and economic resilience
3x income from non-cocoa sources
bank accounts (38% vs. 23%)
food hardships (2% vs. 6%)
Community advocacy and development
26% community projects
 
 

Outcome assessment reports for Ghana and Côte d'Ivoire are underway. Stay tuned!

Follow our progress

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